245 more COVID-19 deaths reported by Florida health officials | #predators | #childpredators | #kids

Below is a log of the day’s events as it relates to the global coronavirus pandemic.

1:45 p.m. — Americans’ resistance to curbs on everyday life is seen as a key reason the U.S. has racked up more confirmed coronavirus deaths and infections by far than any other country. Read more about how America has almost 5 million COVID-19 cases HERE.

12:30 p.m. — The Florida Department of Education announced that starting August 5th, state-supported drive-thru COVID-19 testing sites will prioritize testing for children under the age of 18.

12:15 p.m. — Florida’s sales-tax “holiday” starts Friday and will allow back-to-school shoppers to avoid paying sales taxes. See the list of included supplies of HERE.

12:00 p.m. — Governor Ron DeSantis and First Lady Casey DeSantis held a coronavirus roundtable in Jacksonville.

10:45 a.m. — The Florida Department of Health reported another 5,446 new cases and 245 more deaths on Tuesday. The statewide case total is now at 497,330 and the death toll is at 7,402. That is a significant increase in deaths, as the single-highest one-day jump so far was on July 30th with 257 deaths.

The increase in deaths on Tuesday brought Florida’s seven-day average in daily reported deaths to 184 — its highest rate yet and just behind Texas for the past week with 186. They compare with more than 760 in average daily deaths for New York at its peak in mid-April.

The number of people being treated for COVID-19 in hospitals statewide continued a nearly two-week downward trajectory, with 7,797 patients in the late morning Tuesday, from 7,991 the day before and down from highs of more than 9,500 about two weeks ago, said the Department of Health.

Also, for the 10th day in a row, there were fewer than 10,000 newly recorded cases, with only 5,446 positive results reported in a 24-hour period. Whether these numbers reflect a sustained downward trend won’t be clear until fresh results are reported, because many large testing sites were closed over the weekend and into Monday due to Tropical Storm Isaias. Those sites have since reopened.

9:45 a.m. — A new report shows that Publix has seen a $2.5 billion increase in sales due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Read how the numbers were broken down HERE.

9:00 a.m. — State-run coronavirus testing sites reopened on Tuesday after shutting down over the weekend because of Isaias. The Orange County Convention Center location will open at 9 a.m. Cases have recently dropped in that county but officials are urging residents to stay cautious. See why HERE.

8:00 a.m. — Orange County will reopen a free COVID-19 testing site at the Econ Soccer Complex on Tuesday morning. Testing will be available here Tuesday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. You must be a resident of Orange County to be tested and an appointment is required.

7:00 a.m. — Detectives who track child predators in Central Florida have a stark warning for families: their caseload has more than doubled since the start of the pandemic. They are warning parents to monitor their child’s activity online. See more about how the COVID-19 pandemic is the perfect storm for sex crimes HERE.

6:30 a.m. — Orange County is encouraging residents to mask up in an artistic way. See the themed-bus they debuted HERE.

6:00 a.m. — Orange County leaders are urging people to get used to their face masks as they will be around until a vaccine is developed. Read how several factors could contribute to the mandate lasting even longer HERE.

5:30 a.m. — Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried has launched her own statewide campaign to urge people to protect themselves and slow the spread of COVID-19. See what it urges residents to do HERE.

5:00 a.m. — The Florida Department of Health reported another 4,752 new cases and 73 more deaths on Monday. The statewide case total is now at 491,884 and the death toll for Florida residents is at 7,157. This is the smallest single-day increase in cases since June 23rd, when 3,286 new cases were reported.

RELATED: Interactive map of COVID-19 cases across Florida 

Phase two of Florida’s reopening is ongoing. The following is in effect:

  • Restaurants can now allow bar-top seating with appropriate social distancing.
  • Bars and pubs were originally able to operate with 50 percent capacity indoors and full capacity outside as long as appropriate social distancing is followed. However, the state has put a temporary ban on liquor sales at bars as COVID-19 cases surge, forcing many bars to close.
  • Retail stores can now operate at full capacity with responsible social distancing and sanitization protocols.
  • Gyms can now operate at full capacity as well with appropriate social distancing and frequent sanitization. 
  • Entertainment businesses, like movie theaters, concert houses, auditoriums, playhouses, bowling alleys and arcades, can operate at 50 percent with appropriate social distancing and sanitization protocols. 
  • Personal services businesses, including but not limited to tattoo parlors, acupuncture establishments, tanning salons, and massage establishments, may operate with guidance from the Florida Department of Health.
  • Pari-mutuel betting facilities can submit a request to reopen to the Department of Business and Professional Regulation. The request must include an endorsement from their county mayor or county administrator if there is no mayor.

Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach — which are the counties that got hit the heaviest by coronavirus in Florida — will remain in phase one for the time being. When ready, they can seek approval from their county mayor or county administrator to enter phase two.

RELATED: In-school learning v.s. virtual school: What is the best route for your little learner?

Coronavirus can spread from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth, including when an individual coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land on objects and surfaces. Others can then contract the virus by touching these objects or surfaces, then their eyes, nose or mouth. 

As stated before, symptoms of the coronavirus include fever, cough and shortness of breath. They may show in as few as two days or as many as 14 days following exposure, the Florida Department of Health says. Most people recover from COVID-19 without special treatment, but the elderly and those with underlying medical problems are more likely to develop serious illness.

If you display coronavirus symptoms, you should contact a local health organization and make them aware of your condition prior to arrival while also following specific instructions or guidelines they may have.

RELATED: Winter Garden man who recovered from COVID-19 gets $26,000 hospital bill

If you are experiencing a medical emergency, call 911 and let them know if you have been infected or believe that you may be. If you are infected, a medical professional or another authority will likely advise that you remain isolated while sick. This includes staying at home and not going into public places or large events.

Please visit the Department’s dedicated COVID-19 webpage for information and guidance regarding COVID-19 in Florida.

For any other questions related to COVID-19 in Florida, please contact the Department’s dedicated COVID-19 Call Center by calling 1-(866) 779-6121. The Call Center is available 24 hours a day. Inquiries may also be emailed to COVID-19@flhealth.gov.

RELATED: CDC forecast shows nearly 20,000 more Americans could die of COVID-19 by Aug. 22

Globally, there have been over 18.3 million COVID-19 cases, resulting in over 694,000 deaths, according to John Hopkins University.

Below is an interactive John Hopkins University dashboard, showing a country-by-country breakdown of positive COVID-19 cases across the world.

MOBILE USERS: Click here to view the interactive John Hopkins University dashboard

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