Adolescents Deal With Psychological Stress Better by Moderate Internet Use Than Spending Longer Hours Online | #socialmedia | #children


A new study recently showed that teens aged 13 to 17 years old belonging to socioeconomic backgrounds and spending time online in moderation after experiencing psychological stress are dealing with hardship far better than those spending long hours online or those totally avoiding technology.

A Latest LY report specified that according to the lead author of the new research Kathryn Modecki with Griffith University’ Menzies Health Institute of School of Applied Psychology, adolescents are smart, making use of technology “to their own advantage.”

In addition, since these individuals, in their adolescence stage, who belong to the disadvantaged setting are inclined to have lesser local supports, the research sought to discover if online engagement helped decrease their stress.

There has been an inclination to assume that teens’ use of technology is negative and dangerous, although such an extensive assumption is borne out by what is known about the developmental phase of adolescence.

ALSO READ: Research Finds Boy Playing Video Games Have Lower Risk of Depression


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A new study found adolescents who had moderate technology engagement in the hours following a stressful situation bounced back more preparedly and encountered smaller surges in adverse emotions such as worry and sadness than the adolescents who did not use technology regularly or habitually used such, as a coping mechanism.

Teens’ Use of Technology

To collect firsthand data on teenagers and technology, authors of the study, Adolescents’ Online Coping: When Less Is More, but None Is Worse, published in Clinical Psychological Science, researchers provided over 200 adolescents living with low socioeconomic settings with iPhones.

The teenagers were given instructions to report on their use of technology, sources of stress, and emotions five times each day for one week while using the iPhones given them, exactly as they would use their personal smartphones.

The data were applied to compare the emotional conditions of adolescents who used technology in moderation, for longer hours, or not at all when dealing with psychological stress.

A similar EurekAlert! the report said results showed that adolescents who had moderate technology engagement, in the hours following a stressful situation bounced back more preparedly and encountered smaller surges in adverse emotions such as worry and sadness than the adolescents who did not use technology, regularly or habitually used such, as a coping mechanism.

Staying Online in Moderation

Modecki explained, they discovered a just-right “Goldilocks” effect in which moderate amounts of online coping helped alleviate surges in negative emotions, not to mention dips in happiness.

Amidst the everyday stressors, when these individuals in their adolescence engaged in the search for emotional support, they experienced better stress relief in the short term.

The researchers said the online space is serving not only as a short-term distraction but a resource for adolescents to seek support and information about what’s worrying or distressing them.

By leveling the playing field for the access of that particular information and support, this coping mechanism may be particularly appropriate for teens in low-income settings.

Teens on Social Media

According to Mayo Clinic, social media enables teens to generate online identities, communicate with other people, and develop social networks.

Such networks can offer teens valuable support, specifically helping those who encounter exclusion or with disabilities or chronic diseases.

In addition, adolescents use social media as well for self-expression and entertainment. The platforms can expose these young individuals to current events, enabling them to interact across geographic obstructions and teach them about various subjects, including healthy behaviors.

Lastly, social media, treated as humorous or distracting or offers a meaningful link to peers, and wide social networking might help young people prevent depression.

Related information about Teens and the use of technology is shown on Psych Hub’s YouTube video below:

 

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Check out more news and information on Mental Health in Science.



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