Baltimore students treated to screening of ‘Wakanda Forever’ | #students | #parents



THE STORY. MORE THAN 900 STUDENTS FROM SIX CITY HIGH SCHOOLS JOINED STUDENTS FROM BALTIMORE’S HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES FOR A REALLY SPECIAL TREAT THIS MORNING. AN EXCLUSIVE SCREENING AT THE SENATOR THEATER OF THE NEW BLACK PANTHER FILM WAKANDA FOREVER THE POWER OF IMAGINATION, THE POWER OF DREAMING, THE POWER OF WHAT WE ALL CAN BECOME OUR DREAMS, OUR ASPIRATIONS, OUR GOALS. FRANKLIN BAKER IS PRESIDENT AND CEO OF UNITED WAY CENTRAL MARYLAND, WHICH HELPED ORGANIZE THE SCREENING. BAKER SAYS THE ORIGINAL BLACK PANTHER MOVIE CAPTURED IMPORTANCE OF BLACK REPRESENTATION IN OUR CULTURE. WITH THIS NEXT INSTALL PICKING UP WHERE THAT MOVIE LEFT OFF, LOTS OF IMAGERY AROUND WHAT YOU CAN BE IF YOU JUST FIGHT HARD FOR WHAT YOU WANT. IF YOU PUT A STAKE IN THE GROUND AND DETERMINED YOU’RE GOING TO MAKE SURE YOU DO EVERYTHING YOU CAN TO SUCCEED. IN FACT, IN BALTIMORE CITY SCHOOLS, THE CULTURAL IMPACT OF THE ORIGINAL FILM LED CITY TEACHERS TO DEVELOP A CURRICULUM AROUND IT. AND I THINK FOR ME, IT’S MOST IMPORTANT FOR ME TO LOOK AT THE CULTURE IF IT GETS BEHIND THIS MOVIE. I THINK IT’S REALLY IMPORTANT FOR THE BLACK COMMUNITY. IT’S REALLY IMPORTANT FOR THE FILM COMMUNITY IS REALLY IMPORTANT FOR THE ARTISTIC COMMUNITY. IT’S REALLY IMPORTANT FOR US TO LOOK AT THIS MOVIE AND SAY, LIKE, WHAT IS BEING HAVE BEEN DONE BEFORE? HOW CAN WE MAKE THIS BETTER? HOW CAN WE DO THIS AGAIN IN THE FUTURE? STUDENTS FROM COPPIN STATE TELLING US THEY FEEL THE FILM CAN HELP FELLOW STUDENTS GAIN REAL LIFE INSPIRATION AT MOVIES LIKE THIS ARE IMPORTANT. NOT ONLY TO THE FANS, BUT ALSO TO THE BLACK COMMUNITY IN GENERAL. I THINK WE LOVE COMING OUT FOR THIS MOVIE SPECIFICALLY AND FOR THIS SERIES, SO I’M JUST REALLY EXCITED TO SEE WHAT THEY DO WITH IT, AND I’M REALLY EXCITED TO BE HERE I

Hundreds of Baltimore schools, HBCU students treated to exclusive screening of ‘Wakanda Forever’

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                Some lucky Baltimore City school students got a break from the classroom Friday for an exclusive screening of the new "Black Panther" movie, "Wakanda Forever."The United Way of Central Maryland teamed up with the Propel Center to bring more than 900 students from six city high schools together with college students from Baltimore's Historically Black Colleges and Universities for a special treat at the Senator Theatre.Franklin Baker, president and CEO of the United Way of Central Maryland, said the original "Black Panther" movie captured the importance of Black representation in American culture."The power of imagination, the power of dreaming, the power of what we all can become of dreams, aspirations, our goals," Baker said.He said the next installment picks up where the last movie left off."Lots of imagery about what you can be if you just fight hard for what you want, if you put a stake in the ground and determine if you're going to make sure that you do everything you can to succeed," Baker said.In Baltimore City schools, the cultural impact of the original film led city teachers to develop a curriculum around it."I think, for me, it's most important to look at the cultural significance behind this movie. I think it's really important for the Black community, the film community, for the artistic community, it's important for us to look at this movie and say what's being done that hasn't been done before, how can we make this better in the future?" said Brayden Hamilton, a student at the Baltimore School for the Arts.Students from Coppin State University told 11 News they felt the film also can help fellow students gain real-life inspiration."Movies like this are important not only to the fans, but also to the Black community, in general," said Jamie Reed, a Coppin student. "I think we love coming out for this movie specifically and for the series. I'm just really excited to see what they do with it, and I'm really excited to be here."


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                <strong class="dateline">BALTIMORE —</strong>                                           Some lucky Baltimore City school students got a break from the classroom Friday for an exclusive screening of the new "Black Panther" movie, "Wakanda Forever."

The United Way of Central Maryland teamed up with the Propel Center to bring more than 900 students from six city high schools together with college students from Baltimore’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities for a special treat at the Senator Theatre.

Franklin Baker, president and CEO of the United Way of Central Maryland, said the original “Black Panther” movie captured the importance of Black representation in American culture.

“The power of imagination, the power of dreaming, the power of what we all can become of dreams, aspirations, our goals,” Baker said.

He said the next installment picks up where the last movie left off.

“Lots of imagery about what you can be if you just fight hard for what you want, if you put a stake in the ground and determine if you’re going to make sure that you do everything you can to succeed,” Baker said.

In Baltimore City schools, the cultural impact of the original film led city teachers to develop a curriculum around it.

“I think, for me, it’s most important to look at the cultural significance behind this movie. I think it’s really important for the Black community, the film community, for the artistic community, it’s important for us to look at this movie and say what’s being done that hasn’t been done before, how can we make this better in the future?” said Brayden Hamilton, a student at the Baltimore School for the Arts.

Students from Coppin State University told 11 News they felt the film also can help fellow students gain real-life inspiration.

“Movies like this are important not only to the fans, but also to the Black community, in general,” said Jamie Reed, a Coppin student. “I think we love coming out for this movie specifically and for the series. I’m just really excited to see what they do with it, and I’m really excited to be here.”

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