#childpredator | Long Branch woman in jail for stealing from nonprofit employer


A former administrator of a nonprofit will spend a few years behind bars for stealing more than $400,000 from the organization that’s devoted to assisting low- and middle-income earners.

The Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office announced Monday that Debra Agresti, of Long Branch, has been sentenced to 5 years in prison. She has also been ordered to pay back nearly every dollar she stole.

The 59-year-old had pleaded guilty to a charge of second-degree theft. She admitted that while working for the Affordable Housing Alliance, she used funds for unauthorized purchases of gift cards and used those cards to pay for personal expenses and to obtain goods and services from various vendors.

Agresti made the unauthorized purchases between August 2012 and March 2019, with a credit card associated with the nonprofit, authorities said. To further the ruse, she intercepted monthly statements and created false invoices to make up for the money she had spent on gift cards.

Agresti acted alone, authorities said, and stole $449,514.22 from the Neptune-based nonprofit that assists individuals and families in Monmouth, Ocean, and Middlesex counties.

Agresti was fired from her job in 2019 after the theft was discovered. She was hired by AHA as an administrative assistant in 2007 and was later promoted to director of administration.

Contact reporter Dino Flammia at dino.flammia@townsquaremedia.com.

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NJ teachers and educators caught in sex crime busts

Over the past few years, state lawmakers have taken on the challenge of dealing with accused child predators among the ranks of teachers and educators.

In 2018, the so-called “pass the trash” law went into effect, requiring stricter New Jersey school background checks related to child abuse and sexual misconduct.

The follow individuals were arrested over the past several years. Some have been convicted and sentenced to prison, while others have accepted plea deals for probation.

Others cases are still pending, including some court delays amid the COVID-19 pandemic.





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