#childsafety | Concert Safety Tips for Your Teen



Parents have been asking me to take the educational stage and provide some tips for how they can help their teens or older children safely attend a summer concert. So, let’s get on with the show:Do your homeworkFind out all you can about the proposed concert in advance. Is there an age restriction to even attend and another age where adult supervision is a requirement for admission? Older children and even pre-teens need you to be with them at any public event so they don’t get into unsafe situations, while teens may not want you to be anywhere near them.Stay close enoughIf you are still uncomfortable sending your teen to an event where they may be exposed to risk-taking behaviors like drugs or alcohol, insist you go with them but buy your ticket a few rows away from your teen and their friends so you’re there if they need you but not right there with them. If you feel they are old enough to go alone, insist a friend go with them—preferably you know both the friend and their family, so the ground rules for going without supervision are the same for all in the group.Always accompany any child or pre-teen to a restroom or refreshment stall. Remind them never to accept food or drink from a stranger. Be safe and stick together.Know the layout of the concert area so you can identify a meeting place in advance for people to find each other if they get separated. They and you should also look for where the emergency exits are and where security is posted if help is needed. If you do not attend with your children, have them call you at intermission, when the concert is over and when they are in the car or public transportation vehicle leaving the event to give you an estimate of when they will be home.Ear plugs are also essential for large concerts given that the biggest risk can be noise pollution and the hearing damage that can occur if ears are not protected from prolonged loud noise.Hopefully tips like these will allow you to applaud the fact that you are now better prepared for your children to be safe when they attend a concert or public event this summer.

Parents have been asking me to take the educational stage and provide some tips for how they can help their teens or older children safely attend a summer concert. So, let’s get on with the show:

Do your homework

Find out all you can about the proposed concert in advance. Is there an age restriction to even attend and another age where adult supervision is a requirement for admission? Older children and even pre-teens need you to be with them at any public event so they don’t get into unsafe situations, while teens may not want you to be anywhere near them.

Stay close enough

If you are still uncomfortable sending your teen to an event where they may be exposed to risk-taking behaviors like drugs or alcohol, insist you go with them but buy your ticket a few rows away from your teen and their friends so you’re there if they need you but not right there with them. If you feel they are old enough to go alone, insist a friend go with them—preferably you know both the friend and their family, so the ground rules for going without supervision are the same for all in the group.

Always accompany any child or pre-teen to a restroom or refreshment stall. Remind them never to accept food or drink from a stranger. Be safe and stick together.

Know the layout of the concert area so you can identify a meeting place in advance for people to find each other if they get separated. They and you should also look for where the emergency exits are and where security is posted if help is needed. If you do not attend with your children, have them call you at intermission, when the concert is over and when they are in the car or public transportation vehicle leaving the event to give you an estimate of when they will be home.

Ear plugs are also essential for large concerts given that the biggest risk can be noise pollution and the hearing damage that can occur if ears are not protected from prolonged loud noise.

Hopefully tips like these will allow you to applaud the fact that you are now better prepared for your children to be safe when they attend a concert or public event this summer.

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