Cyber #bullying #Affects Around 20% #Kids in the #USA

 Safety and security have always been major issues to the American society, and to the whole world for that matter. As technology advances every day, lawbreakers and all kinds of criminals find new ways to use these technologies for their own ends.

If we take old school bullying as an example, we can see clearly how it developed with modern day tech and expanded to become what we call now cyberbullying. According to Wikipedia, “cyberbullying or cyber harassment is a form of bullying or harassment using electronic forms of contact. Cyberbullying has become increasingly common, especially among teenagers”.

As stated by the Cyber Research Center, around 20 percent of kids, aged between 10 and 18 years old, experienced a type of cyberbullying. Luckily, there are ways parents can use to prevent their child from being a victim of cyberbullying or at least cope with it.

The first thing a child should be taught about the cyber world is that they should not be interacting with strangers, the way they do not do that in real life, in order to protect themselves from any kind of harm a stranger might inflict on them.

However, if the bullying comes from a person they know, children must be taught not to respond, as there no use for arguing with an online bully. If a child is constantly being victimized by a certain person online, there is always the option of changing the child’s email address, phone number, or social media accounts. They must then be reminded not to share this personal information outside their circle of trusted friends.

For social media websites, website hosts can be contacted and the problem can be reported to them, and they should be able to take it from there.

For parents who like to take matters into their hands, there are ways they can put an end to cyberbullying, using both old-school techniques and modern day technology; if they know the name of the cyberbully, they can use websites like johndoe.com to search for their contact information, or their parents’ if the bully was younger than 18 years old, and they can talk to the parents and ask them to talk their child.