Eat Chat Parent focuses on connecting with kids, teens | #socialmedia | #children


Rosalind Wiseman, a New York Times best-selling author, will offers tips for creating a community in which our young people can thrive at Wednesday night’s virtual Eat Chat Parent on Zoom.

Rosalind Wiseman is the bestselling author of “Queen Bees & Wannabees,” the book that inspired the hit movie “Mean Girls.“
Courtesy photo

Wiseman is a teacher, thought leader and bestselling author of “Queen Bees & Wannabees,” the book that inspired the hit movie “Mean Girls,” as well as “Owning Up: Empowering Adolescents to Confront Social Cruelty, Bullying, and Injustice,” a new curriculum for middle and high school students.

Wednesday’s forum will take place from 6-7:30 p.m.



“Rosalind is a straightforward, down-to-earth speaker with a special connection to youth like I have never seen before,” said Amy Baker, the family education manager for Mountain Youth. “Her authenticity, wisdom and sense of humor make for an engaging evening that will teach you how to connect with our youth when they need us the most.”

Mountain Youth is hosting the virtual event on Zoom with its partner, Eagle Valley Behavioral Health.



Wiseman fosters civil dialogue and inspires communities to build strength, courage and purpose. She is the founder of Cultures of Dignity, an organization that shifts the way communities think about our physical and emotional well-being by working in close partnership with the experts of those communities — young people, educators, policymakers, and business and political leaders.

Wiseman’s presentation will provide a deeper understanding of the role and purpose of emotions, teach you how to strengthen communication between adults and young people to avoid breakdowns and power struggles, and share concrete skills to increase adults’ ability to support the emotional well-being of young people. She will discuss friendship, anxiety, social media use, conflict with friends and family, and the constant pressure to “keep up.”

“As young people navigate a constantly changing educational environment, we know a few things are certain, supportive relationships and social skills are critical to their emotional well-being,” Baker said. “But these skills are not ‘soft skills.’ They are essential for young people to engage in education, manage emotions and become responsible and positive members of families and community.”

The Eat Chat Parent conversations are sponsored by Vail Health, Eagle Valley Behavioral Health, Alpine Bank, Vail Resorts Epic Promise, The Slifer Smith & Frampton Foundation, Eagle County Schools, El Pomar, Town of Avon, Eagle, Gypsum and Vail, Eagle River Foundation, Vail Valley Cares, SAMHSA, Wells Fargo, Colorado Office of Behavioral Health and Eagle County Government for all of your support.



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