Foster children reunite with birth parents | #parenting



After living in foster care for several years, these kids are now back home with their biological mother and father.It’s a successful case of what’s called “shared parenting,” when foster parents cultivate positive, supportive relationships with birth parents, which ultimately is for the benefit of the children involved.Braylen and Naveah get to share smiles and enjoy an early Christmas with their foster parents Robbi and Cliff Whittlesey and mom and dad, Elizabeth and Michael Driver.“I made it my mission. when I got a call from DSS that I was going to do whatever I needed to do to make sure they were coming home with me and I worked with Robbi and we all made sure it happened,” Driver said. After a little over a year fostering Braylen and Naveah, Whittlesey said, “There were so many wonderful moments of loving them and sharing them, it was precious to us.”Robbi was in court the day mom and dad officially gained full custody back of their kids.Naveah said, “I was really excited, it was really fun to be back with my family, it made me happy to be back with them.” As the process of reunification began, the Whittleseys realized the kids would be theirs temporarily to fulfill a time of need. “As we got to know Elizabeth and Michael, we saw how involved they wanted to be with their children,” Whittlesey said. “They started getting involved in school and doctors appointments, we saw that love for their children, we all make mistakes and go through different journeys in our life.”Elizabeth Driver said her message to other parents who may have a similar experience is to be in support of the foster parents taking care of the children. “I wanted them to know I can’t do this right now, but you are doing a wonderful job the stuff I cannot do… If you go into it together, it comes out so much better. I literally walked into this with no family, but I came out with two wonderful people,” she said.

After living in foster care for several years, these kids are now back home with their biological mother and father.

It’s a successful case of what’s called “shared parenting,” when foster parents cultivate positive, supportive relationships with birth parents, which ultimately is for the benefit of the children involved.

Braylen and Naveah get to share smiles and enjoy an early Christmas with their foster parents Robbi and Cliff Whittlesey and mom and dad, Elizabeth and Michael Driver.

“I made it my mission. when I got a call from DSS that I was going to do whatever I needed to do to make sure they were coming home with me and I worked with Robbi and we all made sure it happened,” Driver said.

After a little over a year fostering Braylen and Naveah, Whittlesey said, “There were so many wonderful moments of loving them and sharing them, it was precious to us.”

Robbi was in court the day mom and dad officially gained full custody back of their kids.

Naveah said, “I was really excited, it was really fun to be back with my family, it made me happy to be back with them.”

As the process of reunification began, the Whittleseys realized the kids would be theirs temporarily to fulfill a time of need.

“As we got to know Elizabeth and Michael, we saw how involved they wanted to be with their children,” Whittlesey said. “They started getting involved in school and doctors appointments, we saw that love for their children, we all make mistakes and go through different journeys in our life.”

Elizabeth Driver said her message to other parents who may have a similar experience is to be in support of the foster parents taking care of the children.

“I wanted them to know I can’t do this right now, but you are doing a wonderful job the stuff I cannot do… If you go into it together, it comes out so much better. I literally walked into this with no family, but I came out with two wonderful people,” she said.

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