Jaden Ivey, Justin Bean, E.J. Lidell and the upperclassmen NBA draft prospects who’ve caught my eye – The Athletic | #schoolshooting


College basketball season is just getting underway, but NBA scouts are already into one of the great sweet spots of the calendar – the time of year where early-season tournaments offer the opportunity to see as many four games in one day, allowing scouts to check off a huge volume of prospects in a short amount of time. The fact that most of these tournaments are held in relatively desirable places (i.e Las Vegas, New York, California) are another lure, saving many of my former brethren a two-flight January slog to Manhattan, Kansas or Champagne, Illinois.Talent-wise, the one-and-done collegians are always the central attraction. This year is no different with names like Duke’s Paolo Banchero, Gonzaga’s Chet Holmgren and Memphis’s Jalen Duren showing up at the top of most draft boards. As ever, expect the bulk of the lottery selections to be teenagers.

However, I’m going to hold my fire on this group. Experience has taught me that the end is a lot more important than the beginning for these players, and thus to ramp up my evaluation period on them when conference games begin in January.

The upperclassmen, however, are a different story. They already have a body of work we can reference, which leaves us less vulnerable to short-term flukes, and their experience should allow them to hit the ground running. As a result, a November evaluation on these players should have a lot more validity than doing the same with a freshman still gaining his sea legs.

As always, I should start with the important caveat that it’s early yet. Most teams have only played a few games, and a lot of them are mismatches where they beat the tar out of Northeastern Southwest State U A&M. You don’t get extra points for having the right draft board in November, so I reserve the right to change my mind before June.



Source link

.  .  .  .  .  .  . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   .   .   .    .    .   .   .   .   .   .  .   .   .   .  .  .   .  .