New Orleans non-profit aims to bring peace, tackle juvenile crime | #College. | #Students



A New Orleans non-profit organization aims to bring peace in New Orleans while tackling juvenile crime.Ronald Scott founded ‘Brothers at Peace’ in 2015. Since then, his organization has been very successful and continues to grow with chapters as far away as Los Angeles.Scott says he tries to do what he can to keep young people alive, out of jail and help end juvenile crime in New Orleans because he knows what some may be going through.”I am a product of the streets. I didn’t do it right all the time. So, I understand and sympathize with them,” he says.”Right now, we’re looking at our kids screaming for attention. We focus so much on the end problem, but we need to get to the root of some of the things going on in the city right now. I wish that we could touch more children, but the harsh reality of it is that we’re not going to hit every kid. We’re not going to touch everyone’s heart.”Scott says he needs more parents and guardians to be part of the solution. One mother from New Orleans, Tasia Taylor, is a mentor in the organization. She also signed up her 11 and 15-year-old sons.”When I first decided to put my oldest son in, because he was the first one to join, it was very important to have positivity in his life. It was also important for me to give him examples of other things like with the college tours,” Taylor says.Taylor believes it’s important for young people, like her sons, to know these resources are free and available across the city. She says they need mentors to help them grow and figure themselves out.”It becomes a brotherhood, it’s, they’re not alone anymore,” she says.”It’s on us to start reaching for these children. They shouldn’t be reaching for us. We should be reaching for them. We’re praying that we actually get a chance to get in front of that child that needs the help. So, we show how much we care and to show we’re here for them and show them a different way there are people that care. We love you. We want the best for you. We understand what you’re going through. We understand,” Scott says.Scott challenges more parents and guardians to become mentors of any organization, get kids involved and help put an end to the rise in juvenile crime.”We have to be willing to get our hands dirty. We have to be willing to put our hands in that clay and start shaping and molding the future of our city,” he says.Brothers at Peace recently expanded to welcome young women in the organization.Click here to learn more.

A New Orleans non-profit organization aims to bring peace in New Orleans while tackling juvenile crime.

Ronald Scott founded ‘Brothers at Peace’ in 2015. Since then, his organization has been very successful and continues to grow with chapters as far away as Los Angeles.

Scott says he tries to do what he can to keep young people alive, out of jail and help end juvenile crime in New Orleans because he knows what some may be going through.

“I am a product of the streets. I didn’t do it right all the time. So, I understand and sympathize with them,” he says.

“Right now, we’re looking at our kids screaming for attention. We focus so much on the end problem, but we need to get to the root of some of the things going on in the city right now. I wish that we could touch more children, but the harsh reality of it is that we’re not going to hit every kid. We’re not going to touch everyone’s heart.”

Scott says he needs more parents and guardians to be part of the solution. One mother from New Orleans, Tasia Taylor, is a mentor in the organization. She also signed up her 11 and 15-year-old sons.

“When I first decided to put my oldest son in, because he was the first one to join, it was very important to have positivity in his life. It was also important for me to give him examples of other things like with the college tours,” Taylor says.

Taylor believes it’s important for young people, like her sons, to know these resources are free and available across the city. She says they need mentors to help them grow and figure themselves out.

“It becomes a brotherhood, it’s, they’re not alone anymore,” she says.

“It’s on us to start reaching for these children. They shouldn’t be reaching for us. We should be reaching for them. We’re praying that we actually get a chance to get in front of that child that needs the help. So, we show how much we care and to show we’re here for them and show them a different way there are people that care. We love you. We want the best for you. We understand what you’re going through. We understand,” Scott says.

Scott challenges more parents and guardians to become mentors of any organization, get kids involved and help put an end to the rise in juvenile crime.

“We have to be willing to get our hands dirty. We have to be willing to put our hands in that clay and start shaping and molding the future of our city,” he says.

Brothers at Peace recently expanded to welcome young women in the organization.

Click here to learn more.

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