New Plymouth school calls for weeks-long online learning ‘circuit breaker’ to stop Covid-19 spread | #coronavirus | #kids. | #children | #schools


Spotswood College students will be learning from home for the next two-and-a-half weeks. (File photo)
Simon O’Connor/Stuff

Spotswood College students will be learning from home for the next two-and-a-half weeks. (File photo)

A New Plymouth college has come up with a “circuit breaker” to stop the spread of Covid-19 within the school community.

From June 7, Spotswood College students will switch to learning from home, instead of in the classroom, after a “spike in both student and staff absences” due to Covid-19.

In a Facebook message on a page connected to the school, it explained the temporary measure would remain in place until June 24, which was the Matariki public holiday.

The message, signed off by the college principal Nicola Ngarewa, said the school had “robust online teaching and learning practices” so had the ability to move to remote methods when required.

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Spotswood College principal Nicola Ngarewa has announced the school with switch to learning from home from June 7-24. (File photo)
Stuff

Spotswood College principal Nicola Ngarewa has announced the school with switch to learning from home from June 7-24. (File photo)

Along with classroom learning, support to safeguard the wellbeing of students and staff would also be offered during the period, Ngarewa said.

Covid-19 has hit schools around the region hard in recent months.

Last month, Inglewood High School switched to online learning for a short period due to staff absences and a shortage of relief teachers.

At the time, Inglewood principal and chair of the Taranaki Secondary Schools’ Principals Association Rosey Mabin said when Covid was added to other absences and a lack of relief teachers, life became difficult.

She said with increasing student numbers in the past eight years many relief teachers now had full time jobs, so Covid put pressure on the pool of current relievers.

‘’Once they would work for a day or two, now they get a week’s work,” Mabin said at the time.

On Sunday, the Ministry of Health Covid-19 website said there were 1313 active cases of the virus in Taranaki, and that 29,909 people had been recorded as having recovered.



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