#parents | #teensvaping | Locked phone of a 13-year-old who died from an ecstasy overdose could hold the answers her devastated mum needs

Police are struggling to unlock the mobile phone of a 13-year-old who died after taking ecstasy – meaning key clues which could crack the case have yet to be uncovered.

Eboney Cheshire was killed following the fatal dose of the Class A drug which sent her into a seizure in bed at her Rainhill home before she was rushed to hospital, but never recovered.

Today is exactly one year since the tragedy, and detectives are now urging any of the teenager’s friends or teachers to come forward and help their investigation.

The ECHO can reveal how police are yet to unlock Eboney’s mobile phone, which she was messaging on in the hours before her death at home in Sandon Close.

Before going to bed, the 13-year-old, who was unwell with suspected tonsillitis at the time, was busy on the device after going out to buy Lucozade, Monster Munch crisps and noodles from a local convenience store.

The phone currently lies in an office in London, being probed by IT experts.

Much-loved schoolgirl Eboney Cheshire with her mum, Kerry Williams

So far, they have been unable to get into the phone.

No arrests have been made in the investigation.

It is likely anyone prosecuted would be for the offence of possession with intent to supply, rather than a charge of manslaughter.

Detective Chief Inspector Martin Earl, of Merseyside Police, said: “We are trying to unlock it, if we know the password it’s very easy.

“We would really urge them[people], after a year, to come forward and tell us anything to know, speak to people they trust – do the right thing.”

Popular Eboney Cheshire, from Rainhill, was idolised by friends and family. The schoolgirl, much-loved by family and friends, tragically died as a result of ecstasy poisoning aged just 13
Popular Eboney Cheshire, from Rainhill, was idolised by friends and family. The schoolgirl, much-loved by family and friends, tragically died as a result of ecstasy poisoning aged just 13

Kerry Williams, Eboney’s mum, says she is aware her daughter was on Snapchat on the Sunday evening of her death, December 3 last year.

Those social media messages have also proved inaccessible.

Police think Eboney’s pals may have known the teen’s mobile phone password which would also help officers get into her device, and her grandad Peter Williams said: “It [the phone] might just hold a secret.”

One friend, who called her pal while she was having a fit in bed, crucially mentioned to paramedics how “there was a white powder going round”, a comment which has interested detectives.

Officers are also trying to contact a friend of Eboney’s who she was seen walking with in her road in the hours leading up to the tragedy.

Mrs Williams said: “On Saturday[the day before the seizure], her vocal chords had seized up.

Popular Eboney Cheshire, from Rainhill, was idolised by friends and family. The schoolgirl, much-loved by family and friends, tragically died as a result of ecstasy poisoning aged just 13
Popular Eboney Cheshire, from Rainhill, was idolised by friends and family. The schoolgirl, much-loved by family and friends, tragically died as a result of ecstasy poisoning aged just 13

“On the Sunday, we’ve got a video recording, she’s arguing with a boy about the time, who said she was lazy, still being in bed at 4pm[on Sunday]

“It’s a voice recording, they are arguing about the time. It’s them being silly.”

Eboney had nipped out to the convenience store despite feeling fragile from the tonsillitis.

The mum, 40, added: “She would have needed time to get ready to go out.

“She wouldn’t have rushed out, she would have made an effort…no matter how ill Eboney was she always made an effort to look nice when she went out.”

Much-loved schoolgirl Eboney Cheshire with her mum, Kerry Williams
Much-loved schoolgirl Eboney Cheshire with her mum, Kerry Williams

When the teen’s mum found her daughter in bed, her eyes were rolling into the back of her head and her bed sheets were described as “soaking.”

It is also unknown how much of the Class A drug Eboney had consumed, but it could have been in tablet or powder form.

Your GP is a good place to start. They can discuss your problems with you and get you into treatment.

They may offer you treatment at the practice or refer you to your local drug service.

If you’re not comfortable talking to your GP, you can approach your local drug treatment service yourself.

Visit the Frank website to find local drug treatment services.

If you’re having trouble finding the right sort of help, call the Frank drugs helpline on 0300 123 6600. They can talk you through all your options.

She could have taken it knowingly, been pressured to swallow it, or even fallen victim to her drink being spiked, police have said.

It is thought at the time she was sitting on the sofa downstairs, the ecstasy was yet to take full effect, but it sent her health spiralling later that night in bed.

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Anyone with information about Eboney’s death can contact Merseyside Police on Twitter (@MerpolCC) or by calling 101.

Crimestoppers can be contacted, anonymously, on 0800 555 111 or online.


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