Parents worry more about their child being bullied than them getting pregnant: Some 61% fret about their youngster being picked on

Parents worry more about their child being bullied than them getting pregnant, new research reveals.
Some 61 percent worry about their children being picked on, a study found.

Unhealthy lifestyle habits, drug abuse and internet safety also weigh on the minds of many mothers and fathers, the research adds. Pregnancy also features in the top 10 list of worries.

Cyberbulling has previously been linked to depression, anxiety, insomnia and an increased risk of suicide.
Study author Dr Gary Freed from the University of Michigan’s CS Mott Children’s Hospital, said: ‘Simple effective strategies may include not providing personal identifying information on social media, chat platforms, or in shared gaming environments.’

How the study was carried out  

The researchers analyzed more than 2,000 parents with children under 18.

Questionnaires were completed asking the study’s participants about any concerns they have regarding their children.

The findings were published in a university news release.

Bullying is a concern for 61% of parents 

Results reveal bullying and cyberbullying worry 61 percent of parents.

Insufficient exercise is the next biggest concern, weighing on the minds of 60 per cent of mothers and fathers.

Unhealthy eating, drug abuse and internet safety is a concern for 57 per cent, 56 per cent and 55 per cent of parents, respectively.

Child abuse, suicide, depression, pregnancy and stress complete the top 10 list of worries.

The findings further showed parental worrying changes as children age.

‘Parents should regularly discuss internet safety with their children’ 

Dr Freed said: ‘For parents of children aged naught-to-five, cancer was rated as a top health concern even though pediatric cancer is quite rare.

‘Parents may have concerns about very serious conditions despite the small risk for them.

‘While teasing and taunting have occurred on playgrounds for time immemorial, concerns about the effects of technology on young kids’ psyches is a newer development.’

Cyberbulling has previously been linked to depression, anxiety, insomnia and an increased risk of suicide.

Dr Freed added: ‘Parents should regularly discuss internet safety with their children and teens, and ways to prevent problems.

‘Simple effective strategies may include not providing personal identifying information on social media, chat platforms or in shared gaming environments.’