Students In California Fight Against The Erasure Of Black And LGBTQ Community! | #students | #parents


A lamentable set of events unfolded in the whitest county in California when a group of students in the Nevada Union High school set out to oust and attack their own co-students who were from the Black and LGBTQ community.

Nothing new in America, but the country’s shameless state of affairs calls into question the country’s peaceful coexistence and prosperity when it comes to minority rights and dignity. Friends and classmates who were meant to spend a meaningful time together have been brought into schisms by this incident.

Students Urge To Remove School Board Members

Around 1,500 students attend Nevada Union High school, and 80% of them are white.

In the most recent reports from California, a significant group of students from the school has been organizing a massive protest in order to remove school board members who have not put an end to racial and homophobic harassment and are complicit in the connivance that enabled this violence. Dismayed and furious at the incident, the students are politically awakened to defend their cause.

This Tuesday, the high school students will vote to choose a new school board.

These students have already decided to support and elect the candidates if only they are able to take their issues seriously and align with their sincere cause, according to Julia McEvoy of KQED.

Some Responses From The Students:

Responding to the incident, many students from the black, LGBTQ, and other minority communities shared their horrible experiences within the school.

Thomas Grover, a student of Afro-Latino background, a freshman at Nevada Union last year revealed that rocks and stones were thrown at the students who were from the LGTBQ community. Even much worse was the random calls for lynching among certain students, he added.

Another student, of Filipino descent, Anthony Pritchett, also recalls a bitter experience from his first year when he was forced to spend an entire lunchtime with a noose on him, like a pet.

“At lunch, I received a noose that had been tied to me. And I was just hanging out with my friends at school around lunch in a kind of casual fashion when I heard, “Oh, here’s a noose, man.” He said, “Look how funny this is.

These occurrences occurred in Grass Valley, California, a suburb of Sacramento in Nevada County. They made Gruver and Pritchett understand they needed to take action and work to alter the culture of the institution. Within the school library, they started to organize. Pritchett ran for and won a seat on the student board to give himself a voice.

At board meetings, Thomas Gruver decided to speak up. Others cooperated in persuading Kelly Rhoden, the principal, to undertake anti-bias training.

The entirety of the faculty and staff at the school attended all of these sessions, according to principal Kelly Rhoden. “It wasn’t just our instructors; it’s not just them,” he added.

A task force combating racism and inclusion was constituted by the district in response. Then came the reaction. At board meetings, Protecting American Ideals, a new coalition, began to speak up. Judy Wood was one of the group’s participants.

A few hundred people had attended the Nevada County Tea Party rally. They arrived flying American flags and carrying buttons opposing critical race theory.  Since applause wasn’t permitted, anti-racist student activists and their supporters also showed up in large numbers and performed jazz hands whenever their folks spoke.

Despite the fact that many students found the events to be disturbing, they persisted. They proposed a tougher anti-bullying policy, complete with consequences for microaggressions, at another meeting. The school board disapproved of the policy change in May. And that’s when Pritchett began to understand the significance of this Tuesday’s election.

Currently, a freshman at UC Berkeley, Anthony Pritchett, a victim of bullying, claims that a large number of his former high school buddies and himself will cast ballots at home in the hope of putting people in power that will listen to their woes.



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