The five truths to guide the fight to end the pandemic | #students | #parents


The Southern Educators Rank-and-File Safety Committees, with representatives present from Tennessee and Texas, held a joint meeting on November 14 to discuss the five truths for building a movement to end the pandemic, outlined by David North in his opening report to the October 24 global webinar “How to end the pandemic,” which was hosted by the World Socialist Web Site and the International Workers Alliance of Rank-and-File Committees (IWA-RFC).

Reviewing the five points stimulated discussion on the objective crisis of capitalism, the growth of the class struggle in the US and internationally, the role of the media in promoting the “herd immunity” policies of the ruling class, the working conditions in classrooms across the South, and the WSWS’ defense of scientific truth throughout the pandemic. The meeting concluded with a vote to publish a statement of support of the five points, enumerated below, which was approved unanimously.

Third grade at Warner Arts Magnet Elementary school in Nashville, Tennessee on August 20, 2021. (AP Photo/John Partipilo)

The October 24 webinar brought together workers and scientists to discuss the state of the pandemic and how to end it. David North, the chairperson of the International Editorial Board of the WSWS and the national chairperson of the Socialist Equality Party (SEP) in the United States, stated that in order to end the pandemic these five points must be clearly understood:

  1. The target of SARS-CoV-2—the virus that causes COVID-19—is not individuals, but entire societies. The virus’ mode of transmission is directed toward achieving mass infection. SARS-CoV-2 has evolved biologically to strike billions, and, in so doing, kill millions.
  2. Therefore, the only effective strategy is one based on a globally coordinated campaign aimed at the elimination of the virus on every continent, in every region, and in every country. There is no effective national solution to this pandemic. Humanity—people of all races, ethnicities, and nationalities—must confront and overcome this challenge through a vast collective and truly selfless global effort.
  3. The policies pursued by virtually all governments since the outbreak of the pandemic must be repudiated. The subordination of that which should be the unquestioned priority of social policy—the protection of human life—to the interests of corporate profit and private wealth accumulation cannot be allowed to continue.
  4. The initiative to bring about a decisive turn to a strategy directed toward global elimination must come from a socially conscious movement of millions of people.
  5. This global movement must draw upon scientific research. The persecution of scientists—many of whom labor under threats to their livelihoods and even their lives—must be ended. The global elimination of the virus requires the closest working alliance between the working class—the great mass of society—and the scientific community.

Our committees previously endorsed the call for a mass movement of the working class to end the pandemic.

We believe that when the international working class becomes equipped with both a scientific and a political understanding of the pandemic—that is, the nature of the virus and how it spreads, coupled with an understanding of why governments around the world have pursued homicidal and anti-scientific policies—our fight for a policy of global elimination will be successful and will end the pandemic.

At our meeting, we heard reports from educators and workers across the South, including in Florida, Texas, and South Carolina.

Patrick, a worker from Florida, reported on the haphazard COVID-19 mitigation policies in the state, such as optional mask mandates. Allowing districts, counties, and businesses to choose to require masks has done little to prevent the spread of the virus and is a thinly veiled version of the murderous herd immunity strategy embraced by the ruling elite, including Florida’s Republican Governor Ron DeSantis.



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